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we call the power platform, the energy grid needs to be redone, and the knowledge platform. we don't -- we need to do some work on the networks, which is to say broadband, but it's really about how do we apply it? how do we deliver band width that can change education, change health care, change all government services, we get faster, cheaper, better, the same phenomenon on our phones and in our networks, we want to see in public goods and services like education and health care. >> host: mr. levin, how important is speed when it comes to improving our economy? >> guest: depends on a variety of different uses. for example in medicine, we're now moving to a place where we can have wireless sensors improve medicine and that's great. but business uses and other thing things, cameras, geneomic medicine, there's faster networks, president clinton was was dell and he said we can't expect our businesses to compete internationally if they only have access the speed of korea, and he is absolutely right. >> reed hundt, energy is included in your book on technology. why? >> guest: to quote th
system and allow us to speak to the needs of manufacturing, because many are energy-intensive operations and need to be energy efficient so utilizing energy and build into the equation and also innovation, so doing things in a smarter fashion, and able to compete at the international level for jobs, because as we land those contracts with improved operations, that means more american jobs. and that approach, that cutting-edge thinking that enables us to maintain that sense of productivity and our intellectual capacity as a nation and takes the research that we should invest into and allows us to translate that research into jobs. so there are these dynamics of change and reform that can be brought into the discussions here as we go forward, and that will speak, i think, to the vitality, the economic vitality of this nation and the growth of jobs that i think are significant, that are long-lasting and bring us into a sophisticated thinking, which this american society is very capable of doing. mr. garamendi: last year, you and i talked in the last congress, which was last year, you and i
event such as japan experienced has ranged in terms of lessons learned just beyond the energy sector and the nuclear industry to many other areas that could experienced similar events. >> a que. mr. inaba, going back to the effect on the auto industry, are there any changes in return of the resiliency of supply chain or things that have changed since fukushima? >> yes. i think there is a tremendous change taking place. i think we have probably about 400 tier one suppliers but anything beyond that, tier two even down to tier 5, we assume that the supply chain is like a sheep of pyramids and the tier one suppliers take share of the two, three and four out what we found in this case especially the same conductor company it is almost like a spindle, and therefore we have to make an infestation of all of the supply chains all the way down to tier five, so this work has started and what we found is there are about 2,000 critical parts where there is only one single supplier or juan special material for use and therefore there is no replace a devotee on stuff like that. so from then onward
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